Workers Memorial Day

On April 28th each year across the globe we take a moment to remember those who have died at work and recommit ourselves to making work safe.

Over many years unions and their members have struggled to make work safer and we have done a great job but still too many people die at work or from the result of exposure of dangerous substances like asbestos. Although we have strong laws in place,  these laws are now under threat from big business who are pushing Tony Abbott to reduce safety standards and not allow workers to stop work or call on their union to help when safety is threatened.

Right across the country on April 28th there are events where families and workmates can remember those who have died. This year why not join in an event in your state or territory.

What you can do in your union

  • Let your members know about the day and encourage them to attend events in your state and territory
  • Promote the day using social and digital media and other communications
  • Organise an event and ceremony for your industry and members
  • Think about how your union connects with work safety and how you could get more involved

What you can do in your workplace

  • Organise for a minutes silence for those who have died at work
  • Have a safety morning tea that focuses on the day
  • Check if you have a health and safety rep and if not plan how you might get one elected
  • If you already have a rep think about how your reps and delegates can work together better
  • Check if you have an asbestos register
Date Published: 10/04/2018 Category: Health and safety

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